Dean, Department Chairs, and Program Directors

Dean

 

bart-ng1Bart Ng, Ph.D.

Dean, College of Science

Phone: (630) 829-6187| Email: bng@ben.edu | Office: BK 119

Dean, College of Science
BenU Staff since 2011

Dr. Ng, comes to us after a 36-year career at Indiana University- Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). He graduated summa cum laude from St. Joseph's College in Rennselear, IN. Ng earned a Ph.D. from the Univ. of Chicago, completed postdoctoral studies at the Univ. of Toronto, and then began his tenure at IUPUI. He served as department chair at IUPUI from 1986-97, was appointed M. L. Bittinger Chair of Mathematical Science in 2004. In 2008, he was named acting dean for the School of Science, a position he held until joining Benedictine as the dean of the College of Science.

Education

Research / Specialty

Courses Taught

Recent Publications

 


Department Chairs


 

aldrichPreston R. Aldrich, Ph.D.

Systems Biology

Phone: (630) 829-6519 | Email: paldrich@ben.edu | Office: BK 341

Department Chair (2011-present)
Associate Professor

Education

  • Research Molecular Geneticist, USDA Forest Service (2000-2004)
  • Post-doc, Smithsonian Institution (1997-1999)
  • Ph.D., University of Georgia, Athens (1997)
  • M.S., University of Minnesota, St. Paul (1991)
  • B.A., St. Olaf College (1987)

Research / Specialty

Network and Systems Biology; DNA Linguistics; Plant Molecular Ecology; Scientometrics and Philosophy of Science, Wittgenstein

Courses Taught

Biology of Complex Systems, Genomics and Bioinformatics, Molecular Biology, Genetics

Summer Research 2012

Network Biology: My research project this summer involves the application of network and systems biology techniques to the study of epidemiological models involving invasive plants. This is a continuation of work I and my students have done on Ailanthus altissima, the Tree of Heaven (TOH), in which we have studied its pollination ecology (with Dr. Heinz) and genetics, and more recently demography. Last summer I began work with Dr. Comar and students to establish a network-based national grid based on county-level connectivities using US highway and railroad information. This summer I will be collaborating with a multi-faculty research team (myself, Dr. Comar, Dr. Nadolski, and Dr. DeLegge) to model the stochastic spread of TOH and determine mechanisms of controlling the spread based on known population densities (in West Virginia and nationwide) and network connectivities. These methods have direct correspondence with many of the modern systems-level approaches used to study human disease. Experience Needed/Preferred: depends on the faculty with whom you will be interacting most, and may include calculus for some of the collaborators; my approach is based on discrete math methods, particular graph theory and computer programming — any prior knowledge of programming languages is a bonus, but no prior knowledge is assumed (most programming will be in Perl and Python). More about Summer Research

Recent Publications

  1. Aldrich PR, Horsley R, Turcic S (2012, in press) Hybridization network for the system of woody plant gene pools in the United States. Plant Biosystems
  2. Aldrich PR, Horsley RK, Turcic SM (2011) Symmetry in the language of gene expression: A survey of gene promoter networks in multiple bacterial species and non-σ regulons. Symmetry 3: 750-766.
  3. Aldrich PR (2011) Diffusion limited aggregation and the fractal evolution of gene promoter networks. Network Biology 1(2):99-111.
  4. Aldrich PR, Cavender-Bares J (2011) Quercus. In: Kole C, editor. Wild Crop Relatives: Genetic, Genomic and Breeding Resources, Volume 10: Relatives of Forest Trees. Heidelberg: Springer.
  5. Aldrich PR, Horsley RK, Ahmed YA, Williamson JJ, Turcic SM (2010) Fractal topology of gene promoter networks at phase transitions. Gene Regulation and Systems Biology 2010(4): 75–82.
  6. Aldrich PR, Briguglio J, Kapadia S, Morker M, Rawal A, Kalra P, Huebner C, Greer GK (2010) Genetic structure of the invasive tree Ailanthus altissima in eastern United States cities. Journal of Botany 2010(795735): 9 pg.
  7. Aldrich PR (2008) Chapter 9: Molecular Mapping and Breeding in Forest Trees, vol. 2. In: C. Kole and Abbott (eds.), Principles and Practices of Plant Genomics, Science Publishers, Inc., Enfield, New Hampshire, USA
  8. Aldrich PR, Brusa A, Heinz CA, Greer GK, Huebner C. (2008) Floral visitation of the invasive Stinking Ash in western suburban Chicago. Transactions of the Illinois State Academy of Science 101: 1-12.
  9. Aldrich P R, Glaubitz J, Parker GR, Rhodes OE, Michler CH (2005) Genetic structure inside a declining red oak community in old-growth forest. Journal of Heredity 96: 627-634.
  10. Aldrich PR, Parker GR, Romero-Severson J, Michler CH (2005) Confirmation of oak recruitment failure in Indiana old-growth forest: 75 years of data. Forest Science 51: 406-416.

lsmith-1Lee Ann Smith, Ph.D.

Molecular Neurobiology

Phone: (630) 829-6525 | Email: lsmith@ben.edu | Office: BK 340

Assistant Department Chair (2011-present)
Associate Professor
BenU Faculty since 2004

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Connecticut Health Center (2004)
  • B.S., Benedictine University (1998)

Research / Specialty

Aging, Genomics and Bioinformatics, Drosophila, RNA Processing

Courses Taught

Genetics, rDNA Lab, Neurobiology and Cell/Molecular Biology Lab

Peer-Reviewed Publications Undergraduate students are underlined.

  1. G. Garber, L.A. Smith, R.A. Reenan, and B. Rogina. “Effect of sodium channel abundance on Drosophila, development, reproductive capacity and aging.” Fly 6(1):2012: 57-67. http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/fly.18570.
  2. Lee Ann Smith, Ishtiaq Habib, Stephanie Shirkey, Brian Talon, Alexander Milne, and Jeremy Nadolski. “Sexual dimorphism in the effect of a taurine supplemented diet on life span in adult Drosophila melanogaster.” International Journal of Zoological Research. (2011). 7(1):34-48. DOI:10.3923/ijzr.2011.
  3. Jeremy Nadolski and Lee Ann Smith. “Combining Efforts to Encourage Student Research in Collaborative Quantitative Fields.” PRIMUS (Problems, Resources, and Issues in Mathematics Undergraduate Studies) (2010). 20(3): 228-44.
  4. L. Smith, J. Gross, and D.K. Morest . “Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) in the cochlear nucleus of the adult mouse following acoustic overstimulation.” Hearing Research 2002 Jul;169(1-2):1-12.

Additional Publications

  1. J. Nadolski, L. A. Smith and P. Marquez. “Stalactite Plot for Outlier Detection in the Presence of a Computationally Singular Covariance Matrix.” 2007 Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Section on Statistical Computing, [CD-ROM], Alexandria, VA; American Statistical Association. Pages 1892-94.
 
 

nohlDan Nohl, Ph.D.

Computer Science and Computer Information Systems

Phone: (630) 829-6560 | Email: dnohl@ben.edu | Office: BK 015C

Department Chair of Computer Science and Computer Information Systems and Mathematics
Professor
BenU faculty since 1987

Education

  • Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology
  • M.S., University of Illinois
  • B.S., University of Illinois

Research / Specialty

Courses Taught

Dan Nohl received his B.S. in Mathematics Education from the University of Illinois in 1973, his M.S. in Computer Science Education from the University of Illinois in 1977, and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1990. He was a mathematics teacher at Malta High School for two years and was a computer science professor at Jamestown Community College (3 years) and at Aurora University (7 years). He joined the faculty at Benedictine University in 1987.

Recent Publications

 
 

MarinTim Marin, Ph.D.

Chemistry and Physics

Phone: (630) 829-6579 | Email: tmarin@ben.edu | Office: BK 325

Department Chair of Chemistry and Physics (2011)
Associate Professor
BenU faculty since 2003

Education

  • Ph.D. Northwestern University (2001)
  • M.S. Northwestern University (1997)
  • B.S. Benedictine University (1996)

Research / Specialty

radiation chemistry, spectroscopy, photophysics, electron-transfer processes, chemical and physical properties of water

Courses Taught

Classical Thermodynamics, Quantum and Statistical Mechanics, Molecular Dynamics and Kinetics, Physical Chemistry Laboratory, General Chemistry, General Chemistry Laboratory, Computational Modeling of Physical and Chemical Principles

Recent Publications

  1. Design of an Optical Transmission Cell for Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Supercritical Water. Timothy W. Marin, Ireneusz Janik, and David M. Bartels. to be submitted to Review of Scientific Instruments.
  2. A Vacuum Ultraviolet Filtering Monochromator for Synchrotron-Based Spectroscopy. Ireneusz Janik and Timothy W. Marin. submitted to Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research.
  3. The Sweet Spot: Radiation Stability of Ionic Liquids Consisting of Sulfonyl Imide Anions. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, Jasmine Hatcher, and James F. Wishart. submitted to Journal of Physical Chemistry B.
  4. Elemental and Isotopic Analysis of Trace Lanthanides Using One-Pot Sequestration and Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry. Ilya A. Shkrob, Michael R. Savina, Timothy W. Marin, and Keith A. Lehuta. submitted to Analytical Chemistry.
  5. Photoredox Reactions and the Catalytic Cycle for CO2 Fixation and Methanogenesis on Metal Oxides. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Haying He, and Peter Zapol. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, in press, 2012.
  6. Heteroatom-Transfer Coupled Photoreduction and Carbon Dioxide Fixation on Metal Oxides. Ilya A. Shkrob, Nada M. Dimitrijevic, Timothy W. Marin, Haying He, and Peter Zapol. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, in press, 2012.
  7. Radiation-Induced Fragmentation of Diamide Extraction Agents in Ionic Liquid Diluents. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Jason R. Bell, Huimin Luo, Sheng Dai, Jasmine L. Hatcher, R. Dale Rimmer, and James F. Wishart. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2012, 116, 2234-2243.
  8. Electron Localization and Radiation Chemistry of Amides. Ilya A. Shkrob and Timothy W. Marin. Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 2012, 116, 1746-1757.
  9. Radiation and Radical Chemistry of NO3-, HNO3, and Dialkylphosphoric Acids in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, and James F. Wishart. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2011, 115, 10927-10942.
  10. Surface-Modified, Collapsible, Controlled-Pore Glass Materials for Sequestration and Immobilization of Trivalent Metal Ions. Ilya A. Shkrob, Angela R. Tisch, Timothy W. Marin, John V. Muntean, Michael D. Kaminski, and A. Jeremy Kropf. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, 2011, 50, 4686-4696.
  11. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions and Protic Equilibria in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids Containing Crown Ethers. Timothy W. Marin, Ilya A. Shkrob, and Mark L. Dietz. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2011, 115, 3912-3918.
  12. On the Radiation Stability of Crown Ethers in Ionic Liquids. Ilya A. Shkrob and Timothy W. Marin. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2011, 115, 3903-3911.
  13. Radiation-Induced Redox Reactions and Fragmentation of Constituent Ions in Ionic Liquids. II. Imidazolium Cations. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, Jasmine Hatcher, and James F. Wishart. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2011, 115, 3889-3902.
  14. Radiation-Induced Redox Reactions and Fragmentation of Constituent Ions in Ionic Liquids. I. Anions. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, and James F. Wishart. Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2011, 115, 3872-3888.
  15. Mechanistic Aspects of Photooxidation of Polyhydroxylated Molecules on Metal Oxides. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, and Michael D. Sevilla. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 2011, 115, 4642-4648.
  16. Extraction and Reductive Stripping of Pertechnetate from Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Streams. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Dominique C. Stepinski, George F. Vandegrift, III, John V. Muntean, and Mark L. Dietz. Separation Science and Technology, 2011, 46, 357-368.
  17. Photooxidation of Nucleic Acids on Metal Oxides: Physicochemical and Astrobiological Perspectives. Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Amitava Adhikary, and Michael D. Sevilla. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 2011, 115, 3393-3403.

wigAndrew Wig, Ph.D.

Physics

Phone: (630) 829-6527 | Email: awig@ben.edu | Office: BK 335

Assistant Department Chair>br />Associate Professor
BenU faculty since 2004

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Tennessee (2000)
  • M.S., University of Tennessee (1995)
  • B.S., North Park University (1991)

Research / Specialty

Scanning Probe Microscopy, Optical Tweezers, Physics Education, Outreach

Courses Taught

College Physics Lab I & II, College Physics I & II, University Physics Lab I & II, Modern Physics, Modern Physics Lab, Electronics, Electricity and Magnetism

Summer Research 2012

  • Optical Tweezers: Research will be conducted to use the BU optical tweezers instrument to study biological systems. Optical tweezers use focused light to trap and manipulate small objects. The initial study is focused on the trapping and analysis of E. coli bacteria. The project is experimental and involves learning about optics, lasers, and the interaction of light with matter.
  • Scanning Probe Microscopy: A Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) is a device used to image surfaces of materials with atomic resolution. This project will involve building and testing an STM. It is an experimental project and will involve computer programming and electronics.
  • Recent Publications

 


Program Directors


 

simaAlice Sima, M.S.

Pre-Professional Health Programs

Phone: (630) 829-6585 | Email: asima@ben.edu | Office: BK 322

Program Director
BenU Staff since 1987

Education

  • A.D.N. (RN), College of DuPage
  • B.S.N., Benedictine University
  • M.S.N., Lewis University
  • M.B.A., Benedictine University

Research / Specialty

Courses Taught

Medical Terminology, Practicum

wilsonAllison K. Wilson, Ph.D.

Physiology and Cell Biology

Phone: (630) 829-6520 | Email: awilson@ben.edu | Office: BK 327

Director, Science Content and Process Master's Program
Director, New Faculty Mentoring Program, Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Professor
BenU Faculty since (1997)

Education

  • Argonne National Laboratory (1993-1998)
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Chicago (1990-1992)
  • Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago (1990)
  • B.S., Iowa State University (1980)

Research / Specialty

Cellular Physiology of Environmental Estrogens on Bone Cells

Courses Taught

Endocrinology, Cell Biology, Physiology, Cell Labs Quantitative Biology Lab for Transfer Students

Research Interests

Osteoblasts and osteoclasts, bone-forming and bone-resorbing cells, respectively, mediate growth, modeling, remodeling, and repair of bone. The adult skeleton routinely undergoes remodeling in response to physical, hormonal, and metabolic stresses. In normal bone homeostasis, there is no net gain or loss of bone. However, uncoupling of the remodeling process by increasing osteoclastic activity without increasing bone formation to the same extent, can lead to bone loss.

The objective of my research program is to determine mechanisms by which cadmium causes bone loss. Animal studies indicate that bone loss responses occur at blood cadmium concentrations in the range of levels reported for persons who smoke cigarettes and for workers with low-level cadmium exposure in industry. Cadmium-induced bone loss is also more pronounced in animals that have experienced increased bone stress such as estrogen deficiency, suggesting that women exposed to cadmium are at increased risk for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

To investigate cellular mechanisms for the increased activity of the resident osteoclast population in response to cadmium exposure, cultured cell lines and primary bone cell cultures are used to study the motility, the signals for apoptosis, and the signal transduction involved with cytoskeletal reorganization that must occur when an osteoclast changes from a motile configuration to a resorbing configuration. Cell migration assays, chemotactic assays, cell viability assays, microscopic examination of immunohistochemically or fluorescently-labeled cells, gel electrophoresis, western blotting, and RT-PCR are some of the techniques used in these investigations.

Selected Publications (*denotes undergraduates as co-authors)

  1. Regunathan, A., Glesne, D.A., Wilson, A.K., Song, J., Nicolae, D., *Flores, T., and M.H. Bhattacharyya. Microarray analysis of changes in bone cell gene expression early after cadmium gavage in mice. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol., 191:272-293, 2003.
  2. Brako EE, Wilson AK, Jonah MM, Blum CA, Cerny EA, Williams KL, Bhattacharyya MH. Cadmium pathways during gestation and lactation in control versus metallothoinein 1,2-knockout mice. Toxicol Sci. 71(2):154-63, 2003.
  3. Bhattacharyya, M.H., Wilson, A.K., and Rajan, S.S. Biochemical pathways in cadmium toxicity. In Molecular Biology and Toxicology of Metals, R.K.Zalups and D.J. Koropatanick (eds.), Taylor and Francis Publishers, 2001.
  4. *Blum, C.A., Wilson, A. K., and Bhattacharyya, M.H. A nest box to facilitate excreta collection from mouse dams through pregnancy, parturition, and lactation. Contemp.Topics in Lab. An. Sci., 38:71-77, 1999.
  5. Bhattacharyya, M.H., *Blum, C.A., and Wilson, A.K. The role of metallothionein in cadmium-induced bone resorption. In Metallothionein IV. C. Klassen, ed., Birkhauser Verlag, Basel, Switzerland, pp. 473-476, 1999.
  6. Wilson, A.K., Bhattacharyya, M.H., Miller, S., *Mani, A. and Sacco-Gibson, N. Ovariectomy-induced changes in aged beagles: histomorphometry of rib cortical bone. Calcif. Tissue Int., 62: 237-243, 1998.
  7. Wilson, A.K. and Bhattacharyya, M.H. Effects of cadmium on bone: An in vivo model for the early response. Toxicol. Appl. Pharm., 145: 68-73, 1997
  8. Wilson, A.K., Cerny, E.A., *Smith, B.D., *Wagh, A., and Bhattacharyya, M.H. Effects of cadmium on osteoclast formation and activity in vitro. Tox. Appl. Pharm., 140: 451- 460, 1996.
  9. Bhattacharyya, M.H., Wilson, A.K., Silbergeld, E.K., Watson, L. and Jeffery, E. Metal-induced osteotoxicities. In Metal Toxicology. R.A. Goyer, ed., Academic Press, Inc. San Diego, pp.465-510, 1995.
 
 

nelsonPeter Hugo Nelson, Ph.D.

Physics and Biology

Phone: (630) 829-6552 | Email: pHnelson@circle4.com | Office: BK 331

Associate Professor
BenU Faculty since 2002

Education

  • N.I.H. Postdoctoral Fellow, UMass (2000-2002)
  • Postdoctoral Research Assiciate, MIT (1998-2000)
  • Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1998)
  • M.S., Victoria University of Wellington (1990)
  • B.S., Victoria University of Wellington (1984)

Research / Specialty

developing models of complex physical systems ranging from transport/reaction in zeolite catalysts to structural and thermodynamic properties of self-assembled polymeric and surfactant systems

Courses Taught

Physiological Modeling, Biophysics, Physical Science, College Physics, University Physics, Electricity and Magnetism, Biophysics Research

Summer Research 2012

Biophysics Teaching Materials: As part of an NSF grant I'm developing new biophysics teaching materials. Topics include: oxygen, water, glucose, ion and drug transport; ion channel gating (neuroscience); motor proteins; DNA and RNA dynamics and more. I'm looking for research students to determine the current state of knowledge and to find the numerical data required for biophysical models. Right now I'm looking for students to help me investigate water transport through aquaporins. In the process, we learn some basic physiology, including such things as osmosis and homeostasis of erythrocytes (red blood cells) from a biophysics perspective! There are many other topics available — for more information visit the project web page http://circle4.com/biophysics.

Recent Publications

ferroniEd Ferroni, Ph.D.

Biochemistry and Chemistry

Phone: (630) 829-6541 | Email: eferroni@ben.edu | Office: BK 324

Professor
BenU faculty since 1985

Education

  • Ph.D. - Indiana University School of Medicine (1983)
  • B.S. - Wheeling College (1975)

Research / Specialty

Organophosphate ester synthesis; chemistry of rabbit muscle aldolase

Courses Taught

Principles of Biochemistry; Biochemistry; Intermediary Metabolism; Protein Biochemistry Laboratory

Recent Publications

del-corralPedro Del Corral, Ph.D., M.D.

Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology

Phone: (630) 829-6575 | Email: pdelcorral@ben.edu | Office: BK 338

Academic Program Director, M.S.C.E.P.
BenU faculty since 2012

Education

  • M.D., Sint Eustatius School of Medicine, Netherlands Antilles (2003)
  • Ph.D., Exercise Physiology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (1997)
  • M.S., Double Major Physiology and Physical Education, Ball State University, Muncie, IN (1993)
  • B.A., Interdepartmental Studies - Exercise Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (1991)

Research / Specialty

Primary: Endocrinology and energy metabolism at rest.
Secondary: Endocrinology and energy metabolism during exercise; Preventive Medicine.
Current: Endocrinology and energy metabolism in humans with particular reference to exercise. Within this context, most interested in the HPA-axis as well as in substrate utilization and energy balance in health and disease populations (i.e., diabetes, obesity, adrenal disorders).

Courses Taught

Recent Publications

schurmanRegina Schurman, Ed.D., R.C.E.P., C.P.A.

Master of Science in Clinical Exercise Physiology

Phone: (630) 829-2171 | Email: rschurman@ben.edu | Office: BK 337

Administrative Program Director
BenU Staff since 2007

Education

  • Ed.D., Benedictine University, 2012
  • M.S.,
  • B.S.,

Research / Specialty

Courses Taught