Calculus with Analytics I Lab

MATH 207AB- Spring 2011

Benedictine University

Contents:

Basic Information

Technology Requirement

Academic Accommodations For Religious Obligations (AAFRO)

Course Description/Ojectives

Evaluation

Electronic Devices Policy

Requirements

Attendance and Tardiness

Other Information

Core Goals

Academic Honesty

Schedule of Labs and Quizzes

Learner Outcomes

Collaboration Policy

Dr. Tim Comar's Homepage 

Basic Information:

Instructors:

Dr. Timothy D. Comar (Section B, Course Coordinator)

Dr. Thomas Wangler (Section A)

Office Hours:

Comar

Monday:

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Monday:

1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Tuesday:

11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Wednesday:

1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Friday:

11:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Friday:

1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Also:

by appointment

Wangler

 

Monday:

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Monday:

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Tueesday:

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Wednesday:

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Wednesday:

1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Thursday:

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Also:

by appointment

 

Note: Each student should go to his/her own instructor's office hours when in need of help.

Office: Comar: Birck 128, Wangler: Birck 125

Phone:

Comar: 630-829 -6555, Wangler 630-829-6554

E-mail:

Comar: tcomar@ben.edu

Wangler: twangler@ben.edu

Location: 

Section A: KN 227, Section B: KN 227

Time:

Section A: Tuesday, 10am-12pm

Section B: Tuesday, 1:30pm-3:30pm

Web Site: http://www1.ben.edu/faculty/tcomar/index.htm

Blackboard login: http://www.ben.edu/blackboard

Textbook:

Recommended: J Stewart, Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4e, Brooks/Cole, Cengage Learning, 2010.

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Course Description/Objectives:

This course is co-registered with Math 210 or Math 220. Together, the courses introduce the student to higher mathematics described in your calculus lecture syllabus. The separate co-requisite laboratory component allows for in-depth exploration of the topics using the software tool MAPLE. The goals of the lab are to develop mastery of the mathematical content and some understanding of the methods available to develop solutions to applied problems. Content includes some material that overlaps with your lecture and some topics covered only in the lab, such as conic sections, parameterization, and trapezoidal approximations. Additional objectives include development of your ability to work together with colleagues and develop communication skills.

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Requirements:


There is a prerequisite of a placement exam. Also, students are required to co-register in Math 210 or Math 220 (Lecture) together with Math 207 (Lab). Prompt, complete attendance is expected at all classes. Professional courtesy toward your instructor and your classmates is expected. Labs may be made up in the event of Benedictine University approved athletics or documented illness. There is no makeup of labs for any other reasons. Also, you are expected to stay in the class room and work on your lab until you are finished. If you complete your lab early - and you lab partner is also finished - then you may leave before the end of the period. If you don't finish your lab in class, you have until noon the next day to turn it in. Put it in the appropriate drop box in BK-135 (on the left as you come in).

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Core Goals:
This course contributes to the science component of the core. The course is intended to enable students to continue to meet the following core goals:


1. Demonstrate an effective level of cognitive, communicative (oral and written), and research skills;
2. Achieve a college level of computational skills and an ability to understand and interpret numerical data;
3. Acquire a knowledge of the history and heritage of western civilization including scientific literacy through a knowledge of the history, the methods, and the impact of science on the individual, society, and the environment;
5. Apply liberal learning in problem solving contexts as preparation for active participation in society;
6. Make informed ethical decisions that promote personal integrity, the legitimate rights and aspirations of individuals and groups, and the common good.

Learner Outcomes:

To successfully complete this course, the student will:

  1. Demonstrate ability to successfully approach mathematics problems four different ways: geometrically, algebraically, numerically, and verbally (oral and written forms); this will be achieved through laboratory and written assignments.
  2. Evidence mastery of the geometric viewpoints of differentiation and integration.
  3. Evidence mastery of differentiation and antidifferentiation rules.
  4. Evidence mastery of geometric concepts such as the conic sections.
  5. Evidence understanding of many applications of differentiation, the methods of numeric integration and some applications of integration through problem solving.
  6. Develop group work skills. This is achieved by student participation in laboratory activities.
  7. Develop enhanced written and oral communication skills in the area of scientific communication. This will be achieved through group work in the laboratory, and written laboratory assignments.

 

IDEA Objectives:

      1. Gaining factual knowledge (terminology, classifications, methods, trends). (Essential)
      2. Learning fundamental principles, generalizations, or theories. (Essential)

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Technology Requirement:

Students are expected to use Blackboard (WebCT) for communication purposes and for accessing course information. Use of graphing, programmable, and scientific calculators is encouraged at all times. Specifically, the mathematics department supports the use of the TI-83+ and TI-84+. Any programmable calculator that does symbolic manipulations (e.g. TI-89, TI-92, Voyage 200, or other CAS) will not be allowed on tests and quizzes. At all exams, the calculator memory must be free of additional mathematical material. The computer algebra system MAPLE is employed as a learning assistant and an exploratory tool in lab and will be used on the collaborative component of the final exam. We may also use Excel.

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Evaluation:

Lab Projects (13 at 50 points each)

650 points

Quizzes (5 at 20 points each)

100 points

Total Points

750 points

 

The grading scale is 90% for A, 80% for B, 70% for C, 60% for D, and below 60% for F.  It is the studentís responsibility to seek clarification of the course requirements and evaluation policy.

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Absence and Tardiness:

Absence due to documented illness, participation in Benedictine University athletic activities, religious observance, or other extenuating circumstances will be excused.  It is your responsibility to inform the instructor in the event of such absences.  Class attendance is very important.  It is incumbent upon you to obtain class notes and updated assignments for missed classes. All students are expected to attend each lab session since class attendance is an essential ingredient for success in this course. The student is solely responsible for all material presented and all announcements made in class.

Tardiness will interfere with your time to complete quizzes and lab projects. You should do your best to arrive to the lab on time. If you are a little late, please find an open computer and get logged on as quickly as possible. This should be the exception, not the rule! Under no circumstances should you enter the room if you are more than 10 minutes late. You are expected to stay in the computer lab the entire period or until your lab report is complete. If you need to leave before your lab is complete, say for an appointment or some other prior commitment, you must let me know ahead of time and get permission to do so. This should be done at least a day before the lab meets.

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Academic Honesty:

The search for truth and the dissemination of knowledge are the central missions of a university. Benedictine University pursues these missions in an environment guided by our Roman Catholic tradition and our Benedictine heritage. Integrity and honesty are therefore expected of all members of the University community, including students, faculty members, administration, and staff. Actions such as cheating, plagiarism, collusion, fabrication, forgery, falsification, destruction, multiple submission, solicitation, and misrepresentation, are violations of these expectations and constitute unacceptable behavior in the University community. The penalties for such actions can range from a private verbal warning, all the way to expulsion from the University. The University's Academic Honesty Policy is available at http://www.ben.edu/AHP , and students are expected to read it. Acts of any sort of academic dishonesty will not be tolerated.  All instances will be pursued.  The first case of any academic dishonesty will result in a grade of zero for the assignment or quiz.  A second case will result in failure of the course (that is, a grade of F)..

Your name should appear on all of your submissions of your work.  If collaboration is allowed, you must state with whom you have collaborated.  You are responsible for understanding any authorized collaboriation policies on specific assignments. You must also properly reference any other print, electronic, or human resource that you consult.

First, we expect all work turned in with your name on it to be your work. You are encouraged to work with your classmates to complete the lab reports, but copying all or part of any student's work will result in a grade of zero for all students involved. Please see the below section entitled "Collaboration Policy" for a more detailed explanation.

Secondly, we will pursue every case of alleged academic dishonesty because every incident is a serious matter and it is my obligation, as a faculty member at this institution, to pursue it.

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Collaboration Policy:

The math department encourages students to work together on lab reports. Since the rules for "student collaboration" vary from department to department, the following guidance is provided to clarify what is allowed when working with others on lab reports. You can collaborate with a classmate as you work through the lab, but once you have completed the lab and are ready to write-it-up-and-turn-it-in, that's where you must part company with your lab partner. I expect the work you turn in to be your own work and hence, I expect it to be significantly different than anybody else's lab report. I understand that your graphs and equations will be the same as your lab partners, but I expect the written portion of your lab to be different than your lab partners. I consider turning in "carbon-copy" or "essentially carbon-copy" work a violation of the academic honesty policy and this applies whether the work is a "carbon-copy" of another student's work in your section of the lab or any other section of the lab or any section of the lab in previous terms or any other source.

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Academic Accommodations For Religious Obligations (AAFRO)


A student whose religious obligation conflicts with a course requirement may request an academic accommodation from the instructor. Students must make such requests in writing by the end of the first week of the class.

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Electronic Devices Policy

One aspect of being a member of a community of scholars is to show respect for others by the way you behave. One way of showing respect for others in the educational community is to do your part to create or maintain an environment that is conducive to learning. That being said, allowing your cell phone to ring in class is completely inappropriate because it distracts your classmates and thus degrades their overall classroom experience. For the sake of your classmates, you are expected to turn off your cell phone or set it to mute/silence BEFORE you enter class-every class. Furthermore, if you use your cell phone in any manner during class (e.g. text messaging, games, etc.), you will be dismissed from class and will forfeit any points you might have earned in the remainder of the period. If you use your cell phone in any manner during a test or quiz, you will receive a zero for that test or quiz. (This policy also applies to pagers, iPODs, BlackBerrys, PDAs, Treos, MP3 players and all other electronic communication and/or data storage devices.)

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Other Information:

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA):

If you have a documented learning, psychological, or physical disability, you may be eligible for reasonable academic accommodations or services.  To request accommodations or services, contact Student Success Center, Krasa 012, (630) 829-6340  All students are expected to fulfill essential course requirements.  The University will not waive any essential skill or requirement of a course or degree program.

Final Drop Date:April 17, 2011.

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This syllabus is subject to change.  Any changes will be communicated to all class members electronically.

Contact Dr. Comar: tcomar@ben.edu

 Dr. Tim Comar's Homepage 

Benedictine University Homepage | Department of Mathematics | Faculty Profiles