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Typography

When it is used thoughtfully, typography becomes a powerful brand tool that can reinforce our messages or add visual meaning. BenU’s typography communicates clearly and cleanly, and is flexible for a wide range of situations.

Fonts

Knockout, our primary sans-serif family, is a mainstay in our communications. Avenir, our secondary sans-serif, performs well at small sizes and in longer-form text. Used together, these typefaces create a clear hierarchy for content legible and engaging. Licenses for these branded fonts are limited and are managed by the Office of Marketing and Communications. To request consideration for a license, please contact Mercy Robb at mrobb@ben.edu.

Primary Sans-Serif

Uses: headlines | subheads | lead-ins | pull quotes | callouts

Knockout font

Type Specimen


Knockout type specimen showing upper and lower case alphabet

Weights


Knockout weights from light and condensed to black and expanded

Secondary Sans-Serif

Uses: subheads | lead-ins | pull quotes | body copy | callouts | captions

Avenir font

Type Specimen


Avenir type specimen showing upper and lower case full alphabet

Weights


Avenir weights from light to black, with obliques

Digital Typography

Our brand fonts may not always be available for use in Word documents, PowerPoint presentations and other digital applications. Appropriate substitutes are listed here.

Primary Sans-Serif Substitute

Oswald is the acceptable substitute for Knockout. Oswald is available for no cost from Google Fonts.


Oswald font sample, showing light, regular and bold weights

Primary Sans-Serif Alternate

Use Oswald whenever available as a substitute for Knockout. If Oswald is not available, use Impact. Impact is a system font and should be a default font on your computer.

Impact font sample, showing regular weight

Secondary Sans-Serif Substitute

Arial is the acceptable substitute for Avenir. Arial is a system font and should be a default font on your computer.


Arial font sample showing regular, italic, bold and bold italic forms

Font Usage

Using type thoughtfully is crucial to making our designs look professional. Follow these tips to make sure our typography is consistent.

Leading

Line spacing, called leading, is critical to setting professional-looking type that is easy to read. Leading should be set tight, but not too tight. With our typefaces, text generally looks best with leading set slightly looser than the default.


Examples of good and bad leading

Tracking

Correct letter spacing, called tracking, also makes the type easy to read. Outside of headlines, text should always be tracked at the default setting, and optical kerning should be used when it is available.


Examples of good and bad tracking

Note: Start with leading that is two or three points higher than the point size of the text or use the default setting. This will not always be right, but can easily be adjusted from there.

Sample Setting

Example 1

Use the sample specifications shown in this section as a starting point when setting type in a new layout. These proportions are designed for print, but they apply to digital and environmental applications as well. Since our two typefaces pair so well, keep in mind that it’s possible to substitute one for the other to create layouts that feel more formal or more casual.


Typesetting example showing possible use of Knockout and Avenir for headlines, subheads, body text, pull quotes and captions

Sample Setting

Example 2


Typesetting example showing possible use of Knockout and Avenir for headlines, subheads, body text, pull quotes and captions

Sample Setting

Example 3


Typesetting example showing possible use of Knockout and Avenir for headlines, subheads, body text, pull quotes and captions