Coronavirus (COVID-19) Updates →

Please click here for the latest information regarding Benedictine University's response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

Direct

  • If you see someone in a situation that they appear to not want to be in, ask if they are okay or if you can help
  • If you see someone engaging in behavior that seems inappropriate, tell them to stop

Delegate

  • Call University staff, coach, or RA to step in
  • Tell the friends of the people you see in trouble to help in getting them out
  • Tell the friends of the person engaging in inappropriate behavior to help their friend not engage in behavior they may regret
  • Gather one or more of your friends to help. There is strength in numbers

Distract

  • Invite one or both people to come with you to another room or to go do an activity so you break up the potentially harmful situation
  • Do something to draw attention to yourself 
  • You can always follow up with Direct or Delegate later

 

 

 

What is Bystander Intervention?

 

Bystander Intervention gives us safe and positive options to intervene in a situation where harm may occur. 

To engage in bystander intervention, we must:

1. Recognize a situation of potential harm 

2. Understand our barriers to intervention and how we can overcome or work around these barriers

3. Identify safe an effective intervention options using the 3 Ds

4. Take Action to Intervene

 

We offer bystander intervention annually or by request to help our community learn these skills. Everyone can be an active bystander to help us prevent gender-based violence (sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) on our campus! To find out more information about our next Bystander Intervention training, contact Bernadette Ramsden at bramsden@ben.edu

 

Bernadette Ramsden, LSW
Violence Against Women Act Grant Coordinator
(630) 829-1326
bramsden@ben.edu

Tammy Sarver, Ph.D.
Title IX Coordinator
Professor, Political Science
Scholl Hall, Room 228L
(630) 829-6473
tsarver@ben.edu